Resistance to Doing the Trust and Respect Inquiry (TRI)

Resistance is a natural reaction to being pushed.  This is a core concept in High Probability Selling (HPS).

If you feel pushed into buying an idea, it’s just like sales resistance.  The more someone tries to convince you, the more the resistance builds.

That’s the problem with the Trust and Respect Inquiry (TRI).  When people sense that it’s being pushed onto them, they resist it.

So who’s doing the pushing, and why?

The authors of the book High Probability Selling felt very passionately about the TRI.  They really wanted people to benefit from this, and that desire came through in their writing.  Passion about what you are selling can make people feel pressured, and I believe that’s what happened here.

We handle this differently today.  Still passionate, but less pushing, and we offer more choices.  We teach a gradual approach to the TRI, and we don’t make it mandatory.

For more information about the TRI:
You Have to Get Personal
Establishing a Relationship – Revisited


Workshops in Dec 2018:  Chapter 12 Updated on Tue 11 Dec for $95

Resistance to Doing the Trust and Respect Inquiry (TRI)

Establishing a Relationship – Revisited

In High Probability Selling (HPS), a relationship is something that comes from doing business, not the other way around.

We do not attempt to steer the relationship.  But we do want to find out what a future relationship might be like with that person.  For instance, will we be able to trust each other?

When we have better information about a person, we make better decisions about whether or how we will do business with them.

How do you find out these things?  You can’t know any of this for 100% certain, but you definitely can improve your odds significantly, by asking questions and listening to answers in a very open way.

It’s an inquiry process.  It is described and discussed in the book High Probability Selling (Chapter 7 – Establishing a Relationship).  However, a few things have changed since that book was written.

  • We no longer call it Establishing a Relationship, because that may imply that we are manufacturing a relationship.  Internally, we call this process the Trust and Respect Inquiry (TRI).  Also, we teach a lighter version of that for beginners, in workshop courses called Getting Personal or Connecting.
  • At one point, the book states, “The process of Establishing a Relationship creates trust.”  We would not say that today.  Trying to use this process to make someone trust you is very likely to backfire.
  • The book also says that this is the single most important step in High Probability Selling.  I agree that this process is the most valuable thing HPS has to offer, but it is a lot bigger than just selling.  Also, some people have been very successful in doing HPS without it.  Therefore, I see its value not as a step in a sale, but rather as a whole way of interacting with people.

There is a previous blog post on the same topic from July 2010, titled Establishing a Relationship.

Workshops in Dec 2018:  Chapter 12 Updated on Tue 11 Dec for $95

 

Establishing a Relationship – Revisited

Applying High Probability Selling to the Job Search and Interviewing Process – An Email Conversation

The emails below have been shortened, by deleting some text.


From: Mike
Sent: Monday 15 October 2018 16:57
To: info@highprobsell.com
Subject: Applying High Probability Selling to the job search and interviewing process

Hello Carl,

I just finished reading High Probability Selling.

I am hoping to learn more about how High Probability Selling can be applied to the job search and interviewing process.  While reading the book I was continually struck on the applicability in this area – have you and/or your colleagues considered this?  If so, is there any specific information you may have or could offer in this area?

Mike


From: HPS Admin
Sent: Tuesday, October 16, 2018 1:59 PM
To: Mike
Subject: RE: Applying High Probability Selling to the job search and interviewing process

Hello Mike,

Here is an article on the High Probability Selling blog that might answer some of your questions.

https://highprobabilityselling.blog/2009/10/09/finding-the-job-you-want-joshs-story/

Carl Ingalls
High Probability Consulting
Providing training and materials in High Probability Selling
Tel:  +1 610.627.9030  USA Eastern Time
Text:  +1 484.464.2557
Email:  Ingalls@HighProbSell.com
Website:  www.HighProbSell.com
Blog:  HighProbabilitySelling.blog


From:  Mike
Sent: Wednesday 17 October 2018 11:55
To: HPS Admin
Subject: RE: Applying High Probability Selling to the job search and interviewing process

Hi Carl,

When I read ‘Josh’s Story,’ it seemed to me to be more focused on the Prospecting part of the process.  Also in demonstrating competency as related to a sales-oriented position.

While I agree that High Probability Prospecting is valuable (particularly in identifying job opportunities that are unadvertised), my greater interest relates to those opportunities for which a job advertisement/posting already exists.

I would like to discover more about how High Probability Selling can be applied to the overall hiring process, and in particular, selling yourself to a hiring manager (and others involved in the hiring decision).  Are there further more in-depth resources available in this area (i.e. the Selling and Closing part of the process)?

Thanks,
Mike


From:  HPS Admin [mailto:info@highprobsell.com]
Sent: Thursday 18 October 2018 12:25
To: ‘Mike’
Cc: ‘Paul Bunn’
Subject: RE: Applying High Probability Selling to the job search and interviewing process

Hello Mike,

Yes, there are more in-depth resources that cover the Selling and Closing parts of HPS when applying for a job that is posted.

A good place to start is to study the HPS Book and read more of articles on the HPS Blog.  After that, we offer training in the form of group workshops and/or private coaching.

When applying for a job that is posted, the odds are pretty high that they want to hire someone for the job, but not 100% certain.  Therefore, it is worth confirming this with a direct question about want, which should be asked on the phone before meeting with them.

Ask, “Do you want to hire someone for this job?”  If they answer Yes, which is very likely, ask them why.  Then continue with the steps of the HPS process as shown in the book.  Make sure you ask the conditional commitment question (it’s in the book) immediately after you have set the appointment.  Remember their answer.

If they say no or maybe to the question about want, it is probably not worth proceeding with them.

Carl Ingalls
High Probability Consulting
Providing training and materials in High Probability Selling
Tel:  +1 610.627.9030  USA Eastern Time
Text:  +1 484.464.2557
Email:  Ingalls@HighProbSell.com
Website:  www.HighProbSell.com
Blog:  HighProbabilitySelling.blog


A course on how to use High Probability Selling to find a job may be a valuable addition to the training that we offer.  Most of the details can be found in the HPS Book, but they are not presented in that context.  I’d like to hear your thoughts.  Do you want to start a conversation about this here on this blog?

Comments and questions are welcome.

Applying High Probability Selling to the Job Search and Interviewing Process – An Email Conversation

No Means Not Now

The following conversation is taken from a recent coaching session on High Probability Prospecting, with some minor editing.  The student had been prospecting for a few weeks, and was still on his first round (calling prospects for the first time).  He was frustrated that many people were saying “No” to his offer prematurely.

C:     You are concerned that they are saying no before they know what you have to offer.  This is not important in High Probability Selling.  It only matters when you’re trying to entice someone into buying.

It is important for you to be clear in what you’re saying.  It’s not important for you to finish the offer.  Let them decide when they want to exit.

S:      I’m ok with them saying no, after they’ve heard my offer.  My feelings are not hurt by it.

C:     But it’s not ok for you when they say no before you’re finished telling them what it is.

S:      Yeah, because I don’t think they know what they’re saying no to.

C:     Remember that, as far as we’re concerned, when they say “No” it means not now.

S:      Well, that’s a convenient interpretation isn’t it?

C:     Why convenient?

S:      Well, isn’t that a nice way to kind of convince yourself that, ok that’s just not now.  But you feel, in actuality, that they don’t want to have anything to do with you.  Especially since so many don’t even hear the entire offer.

C:     The main reason we interpret it this way is to remind ourselves that we’re going to call them again later.  Because if you think of “No” as being no, no, no, never, you’re not going to call them again.  And if you do that, you’ve lost one of the most powerful things in High Prob.

When we say not now – you’re not in that place yet, you’re still on the first round.  So it’s not real yet for you.

S:      Not real in that there is a noticeable difference when you call people the second and the third and the fourth time?

C:     Huge difference.  You’re going to get more sales from the people you’ve called a second, third, fourth time, than you are from the people you’ve called once.

S:      I’ve read that more sales are made on the seventh to twelfth call.  That’s where the money is really made.  So don’t stop calling.  So, this basically is playing on that.

C:     Yes, it is based on that.  The Not Now is real.  A lot of the times it just means that they don’t want to hear anything from you right now.  It might change another time, or it might never change.  They’ll usually tell you.  They might tell you to stop calling.

But, most people – as soon as they realize after the second or third call that you’re not going to waste their time with a long spiel – they are far more likely to allow you to continue calling them.  And then, when it does become Now for them, because their circumstances have changed, or whatever, a good outcome is more likely.

Here are some extra thoughts on the topic:

No means Not Now when:

  • You get to the point quickly
  • You accept “No” for an answer without any question or discussion or hesitation
  • You go away quickly (be brief and be gone)
  • You stay in the present moment
  • Your purpose is to find the next “ace in the deck” (someone who wants what you are selling)
  • You call them again and again and again, 3 to 6 weeks apart, with different offers

No means Never when:

  • You never call that person again
  • You are emotionally attached to the outcome (desperate for a sale, and especially this one)
  • You are using a sales method that works by getting the prospect to buy
  • You try to turn a No into a Yes
  • You won’t let go
  • You drag it out
  • They tell you to never call them again

Comments and questions are welcome.

 

No Means Not Now

High Probability Prospecting Questions from a Reader

I recently received an email with some questions about High Probability Prospecting.  The email appears below (in blue), with permission from the author, and my answers are included (in black and italics) after each question.


Hi Carl,

Thanks for teaching the methods of High Probability Prospecting and High Probability Selling. I was really excited when I read the blog, because I found an honest, respectful and profitable way of selling. Hence, I bought the book and 2 mp3 (Selling Financial Services and Chp 12 explained)

I have a few questions after listening though.

  1. How many times should we call a prospect before we move on? In Selling Financial Services, Jacques said that he once called a company 27 times before he got their business. Is there an optimum number of times to call, or should we just keep calling them forever? (assuming they do not ask us to stop calling them)
    My answer:  As long as they keep answering the phone and listening to your offers, call them forever, even if they always say no.  If you leave an offer by voicemail, and you do not get a call back, then treat that the same as if they said no.  If they ask you to stop calling, then stop.
  2. If the prospect do not pick up the phone, do we call them again in the same month until they pick up, or do we call them the next month?
    My answer:  If no one answers, not even voicemail, then call again as soon as you finish your list, even if it is the same day.  Try different times of day, and different days of the week.  If you continue to get no answer at all (not even voicemail), then reduce your frequency of calling that number, from a couple of days to a couple of weeks to a couple of months and eventually never.  Remember that it is more profitable to call someone who always says no, than it is to call someone who never hears your offer.
  3. How many numbers should I be calling? Assuming I prospect 3 hours a day, as recommended in the blog. Also, do I change to a fresh list of numbers to call every year, every 2 years etc?
    My answer:  We recommend that you start with a list of 500 numbers, and then add numbers as needed.  Do not remove anyone from your list just because time has gone by.  A “fresh” list is not as valuable as your list of people who continue to listen to your offers, even when they say no every time.

Anyway, I realised I asked a lot of questions which might be in your training course. Hence, if you could just answer the first question, I would be very grateful. Thank you for your help.

Best regards
{name withheld on request}


Workshops in August 2018:
Connecting on Tue 14 Aug, 3 sessions for $255
Chapter 12 Explained & Updated on Thu 16 Aug, 1 session for $95

Comments and questions are welcome.

High Probability Prospecting Questions from a Reader

Responding to a Telemarketer

I tell the telemarketer that I’m not a prospect.  I wish them good luck on their next call.  I say goodbye.  And then I hang up.

Why?

  • Saying I’m not a prospect is better than saying no, and especially when they haven’t asked whether I want what they are selling or not.
  • I used to say something negative, but that just left me with a negative feeling about the encounter.  Saying something positive (and something that is also sincere) has a better effect on me.  I can get back to being me more quickly.
  • Referring to their next call is my way of planting a seed, an idea that their time and efforts might be more profitable if they put less focus on this one interaction, and more focus on the whole endeavor.  That is one of the basic concepts in High Probability Selling.
  • I say goodbye when I am done with a conversation.  I say it in a neutral tone, the same way I would if I were the person placing the call.
  • I hang up.  It’s kinder than hanging on while they continue to talk.

There are some exceptions.  If I can’t interrupt the caller, I’m not interested at all, and just hang up.  If it is a human caller, and I have time to be interested in the person, then I might have a conversation.  If the person is interesting to me, I might ask, “How long have you been doing this?”

I’d like to hear from you, my readers.  How do you respond to a telemarketer, and how does that make you feel?


Workshops in May 2018:
Chapter 12 Updated on Thu 17 May for $95

Responding to a Telemarketer

Implementing High Probability Selling – Where to Start?

The beginning?  The end?  Bits and pieces?  All at once?  Just the parts that are comfortable or make the most sense?  Nowhere?

It takes a lot of time and effort and practice to learn how to do High Probability Selling (HPS).  There are lots of ideas to unlearn, and lots of habits to drop.

Implementing all of HPS all at once has worked very well in the past, but most of our clients prefer to learn and apply it in steps, slowly and gradually over time.

The problem with gradually adopting HPS is that the transition period can be a negative experience for prospects and customers.  Being subjected to pieces from sales methods that have conflicting purposes can make them wary.  Some sales methods just don’t mix well.

It matters where you start.  It matters because of what the prospect sees.

If you start at the beginning, and use High Probability Prospecting (with no attempt to influence, persuade, or entice), the prospect will initially have one idea of what kind of person you are and how you do business.  If you then switch to using more traditional sales methods on the same prospect, they may decide that you can’t be trusted.

We don’t know if this is the real reason or not, but we do know that people have had extremely poor results when High Probability Prospecting was followed by traditional selling methods.  If you’re going to use any parts of a sales process that is designed to get someone to buy, you’ll get better results by starting out with that process from the beginning of your interaction with a prospect.  And once you switch to using HPS with the same prospect, stay with HPS all the way through the end.

For gradual implementation, we now believe that the best place to start using HPS is at the end of the sales process.  And then add the step that comes before the end, and so on, all the way back to the beginning.

The sequence of steps in the High Probability Selling Process is shown in an earlier post on this blog, Sequence of Steps in High Probability Selling

Note:  In this article, “We” means Paul Bunn and Carl Ingalls.


Workshops in March 2018:
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Mindset Discovery on Wed 21 Mar for $255

Implementing High Probability Selling – Where to Start?