Giving and Selling Advice, a New Mini-Course on the Basics of High Probability Consulting

The next HPS Mini-Course will be a short webinar session, on Giving and Selling Advice (an Intro to High Probability Consulting), on Thu 27 February 2020 at 10am USA Eastern Time.  39 minutes for $39

This mini-course covers the basics on how to apply the ideas of High Probability Selling when giving or selling advice.  The focus is on the delivery of the advice, after any agreements of sale have already been made.

Whenever someone resists being persuaded to follow your advice, the methods of High Probability Consulting may work better.

The webinar will be led by Carl Ingalls in real-time (live).  Content is mostly audio (speaking), with some video (text, graphics).  The session will be recorded (audio and video), and the recording will be made available to everyone who signs up (and pays for) the mini-course.  The recording of this session may also be offered for sale later.

The webinar platform is GoToMeeting.  If you have not already downloaded and installed the GoToMeeting app on your computer or mobile phone, I strongly recommend that you do so at least 30 minutes before the webinar begins.  And even if you have the app and are already familiar with GoToMeeting, please note that they have changed their user interface quite significantly recently, so I recommend joining the meeting 5 or 10 minutes early.

The price is $39 USD per person.  However, I have 10 introductory discount coupons to give away, each $5 off.  If you want one, please contact me (Carl Ingalls) by phone at +1 610-627-9030 or by email at info@HighProbSell.com (before you click on the purchase link below).

If you want to purchase this HPS Mini-Course on Giving and Selling Advice now, you may use this link:  https://high-probability-selling.myshopify.com/cart/31226966409276:1?channel=buy_button

Future HPS Mini-Courses will appear on the HPS Training Calendar at least a week before they are scheduled.


More info can be found at www.HighProbSell.com/workshops/index.html#minicourses

Giving and Selling Advice, a New Mini-Course on the Basics of High Probability Consulting

Don’t be a consultant

The following is copied from a comment left on this blog by David Ross, and is republished here with permission.  We believe that his words will be valuable to all of our readers.

For me the hardest part of High Probability Selling is “Don’t be a consultant.”  A consultant, according to Webster’s, is “one who gives expert or professional advice.”

At one time or another most salespeople feel an urge to share their wisdom and expertise with prospects.  But I can tell you from painful experience that trying to be a consultant will eventually drive you out of sales.  Prospects know that a salesperson’s pay depends on a sale being made, so prospects discount, ignore, or “take with a grain of salt” almost everything that a salesperson says.

The most dangerous of all prospects are the “interested” and the “curious.”  Like the Sirens of Greek mythology, who lured unsuspecting sailors to their doom, the “interested” and the “curious” will engage you with questions that will be almost impossible to ignore; and you will be consumed by a desire to educate and inform.  When you’re done, these “Sirens” will pat you on the head, thank you for your time, and be gone.

Don’t educate.  Don’t inform.  Don’t tell people how great your company or product is; instead, tell them that not everyone will benefit from what you sell and, in fact, some people shouldn’t buy your product or service at all.

Be the un-salesman: instead of trying to convince prospects, let them convince YOU.  This is the essence of High Probability Selling: after saying ‘yes’ to a legitimate offer, the prospect has to answer a dozen or so questions to prove that he’s serious.  All that is required of the salesperson are the guts to disqualify those who don’t make the cut.

Lastly, concerning your reply that “it is hard not to start selling when someone engages in conversation,” remember this rule: there are no conversations with prospects.  There is nothing to talk about until the prospect says “yes” to an offer.  If the prospect does not say “yes” to your offer, the call is over.  Contact the next person on your list.  If the prospect’s reply is vague, ask for clarification: “Does that mean you want ________, or not?”

High Probability prospects will not allow themselves to be easily disqualified.  Let everyone else go in peace; for many are called, few are chosen.

David Ross

Don’t be a consultant

5 Toxic Behaviors that Kill Sales

by Jacques Werth

1. Assume the Sale.  Treat everyone who might buy from you as if they will.  Persuade and convince them.

People who are that easy to convince are probably unwilling or unable to buy.  Many more people will resent you making assumptions about what is theirs to decide.
2. Get Out There and Sell.  You can’t sell ’em if you don’t meet ’em.
You will waste a lot of time that way, yours and theirs.  That will probably be the last time you get to meet them.
3. Act Like a Consultant.  Present yourself as an expert and trusted advisor about what they need.
Most prospects know better than to believe that a salesperson can be an objective advisor.  Salespeople who pretend to be consultants are trusted even less.
4. Find Problems and Solve Them.  Uncover the prospect’s needs and persuade them that you have the solutions.
Most prospects have more problems than they can ever get handled.  If it’s not a top priority for them when you call, they will not buy.
5. Overcome Objections and Close the Sale.  Convince prospects that their objections are wrong, or are actually benefits.
Objections are usually caused by the salesperson’s lack of authentic disclosure or by the prospect’s lack of a commitment to buy.

 

5 Toxic Behaviors that Kill Sales