Don’t Say It – Be It

Saying you are honest is fast and easy, and you can shout it out to as many people as you want.  Being honest takes a lot longer for people to notice, but is far more believable.  The same is true for just about any other virtue we might want to advertise about ourselves.

Using words to impress can backfire.  It’s a shortcut, too often used by people in place of actually implementing the qualities that they want their words to imply.  And this can create doubt, the sort of doubt Shakespeare was talking about in the line from Hamlet, “The lady doth protest too much, methinks.”

Walking the Talk is not good enough.  Skip the talk.  Just walk.

 

Don’t Say It – Be It

“Never Be So Sure of What You Want, That You Wouldn’t Take Something Better” – Chris Voss on Negotiating

Chris Voss is a master of negotiating, and especially in hostage situations.  In this You Tube video, he explains many of his basic principles for negotiating successfully.  Paul Bunn and I saw a lot of parallels between the principles Chris Voss follows in a negotiation situation and the principles we follow in a High Probability Selling situation.

The video is titled “CEO Chris Voss: Negotiate Like Your Life Depends On It | iConic Conference 2017 | CNBC” and is a little over 33 minutes long.  The You Tube URL is http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WKrs7HdhUjM

I invite you to watch and listen to him speak, and then post your thoughts and comments on this blog.

 

“Never Be So Sure of What You Want, That You Wouldn’t Take Something Better” – Chris Voss on Negotiating

Resistance to Doing the Trust and Respect Inquiry (TRI)

Resistance is a natural reaction to being pushed.  This is a core concept in High Probability Selling (HPS).

If you feel pushed into buying an idea, it’s just like sales resistance.  The more someone tries to convince you, the more the resistance builds.

That’s the problem with the Trust and Respect Inquiry (TRI).  When people sense that it’s being pushed onto them, they resist it.

So who’s doing the pushing, and why?

The authors of the book High Probability Selling felt very passionately about the TRI.  They really wanted people to benefit from this, and that desire came through in their writing.  Passion about what you are selling can make people feel pressured, and I believe that’s what happened here.

We handle this differently today.  Still passionate, but less pushing, and we offer more choices.  We teach a gradual approach to the TRI, and we don’t make it mandatory.

For more information about the TRI:
You Have to Get Personal
Establishing a Relationship – Revisited


Workshops in Dec 2018:  Chapter 12 Updated on Tue 11 Dec for $95

Resistance to Doing the Trust and Respect Inquiry (TRI)

Establishing a Relationship – Revisited

In High Probability Selling (HPS), a relationship is something that comes from doing business, not the other way around.

We do not attempt to steer the relationship.  But we do want to find out what a future relationship might be like with that person.  For instance, will we be able to trust each other?

When we have better information about a person, we make better decisions about whether or how we will do business with them.

How do you find out these things?  You can’t know any of this for 100% certain, but you definitely can improve your odds significantly, by asking questions and listening to answers in a very open way.

It’s an inquiry process.  It is described and discussed in the book High Probability Selling (Chapter 7 – Establishing a Relationship).  However, a few things have changed since that book was written.

  • We no longer call it Establishing a Relationship, because that may imply that we are manufacturing a relationship.  Internally, we call this process the Trust and Respect Inquiry (TRI).  Also, we teach a lighter version of that for beginners, in workshop courses called Getting Personal or Connecting.
  • At one point, the book states, “The process of Establishing a Relationship creates trust.”  We would not say that today.  Trying to use this process to make someone trust you is very likely to backfire.
  • The book also says that this is the single most important step in High Probability Selling.  I agree that this process is the most valuable thing HPS has to offer, but it is a lot bigger than just selling.  Also, some people have been very successful in doing HPS without it.  Therefore, I see its value not as a step in a sale, but rather as a whole way of interacting with people.

There is a previous blog post on the same topic from July 2010, titled Establishing a Relationship.

Workshops in Dec 2018:  Chapter 12 Updated on Tue 11 Dec for $95

 

Establishing a Relationship – Revisited

No Means Not Now

The following conversation is taken from a recent coaching session on High Probability Prospecting, with some minor editing.  The student had been prospecting for a few weeks, and was still on his first round (calling prospects for the first time).  He was frustrated that many people were saying “No” to his offer prematurely.

C:     You are concerned that they are saying no before they know what you have to offer.  This is not important in High Probability Selling.  It only matters when you’re trying to entice someone into buying.

It is important for you to be clear in what you’re saying.  It’s not important for you to finish the offer.  Let them decide when they want to exit.

S:      I’m ok with them saying no, after they’ve heard my offer.  My feelings are not hurt by it.

C:     But it’s not ok for you when they say no before you’re finished telling them what it is.

S:      Yeah, because I don’t think they know what they’re saying no to.

C:     Remember that, as far as we’re concerned, when they say “No” it means not now.

S:      Well, that’s a convenient interpretation isn’t it?

C:     Why convenient?

S:      Well, isn’t that a nice way to kind of convince yourself that, ok that’s just not now.  But you feel, in actuality, that they don’t want to have anything to do with you.  Especially since so many don’t even hear the entire offer.

C:     The main reason we interpret it this way is to remind ourselves that we’re going to call them again later.  Because if you think of “No” as being no, no, no, never, you’re not going to call them again.  And if you do that, you’ve lost one of the most powerful things in High Prob.

When we say not now – you’re not in that place yet, you’re still on the first round.  So it’s not real yet for you.

S:      Not real in that there is a noticeable difference when you call people the second and the third and the fourth time?

C:     Huge difference.  You’re going to get more sales from the people you’ve called a second, third, fourth time, than you are from the people you’ve called once.

S:      I’ve read that more sales are made on the seventh to twelfth call.  That’s where the money is really made.  So don’t stop calling.  So, this basically is playing on that.

C:     Yes, it is based on that.  The Not Now is real.  A lot of the times it just means that they don’t want to hear anything from you right now.  It might change another time, or it might never change.  They’ll usually tell you.  They might tell you to stop calling.

But, most people – as soon as they realize after the second or third call that you’re not going to waste their time with a long spiel – they are far more likely to allow you to continue calling them.  And then, when it does become Now for them, because their circumstances have changed, or whatever, a good outcome is more likely.

Here are some extra thoughts on the topic:

No means Not Now when:

  • You get to the point quickly
  • You accept “No” for an answer without any question or discussion or hesitation
  • You go away quickly (be brief and be gone)
  • You stay in the present moment
  • Your purpose is to find the next “ace in the deck” (someone who wants what you are selling)
  • You call them again and again and again, 3 to 6 weeks apart, with different offers

No means Never when:

  • You never call that person again
  • You are emotionally attached to the outcome (desperate for a sale, and especially this one)
  • You are using a sales method that works by getting the prospect to buy
  • You try to turn a No into a Yes
  • You won’t let go
  • You drag it out
  • They tell you to never call them again

Comments and questions are welcome.

 

No Means Not Now

Implementing High Probability Selling – Where to Start?

The beginning?  The end?  Bits and pieces?  All at once?  Just the parts that are comfortable or make the most sense?  Nowhere?

It takes a lot of time and effort and practice to learn how to do High Probability Selling (HPS).  There are lots of ideas to unlearn, and lots of habits to drop.

Implementing all of HPS all at once has worked very well in the past, but most of our clients prefer to learn and apply it in steps, slowly and gradually over time.

The problem with gradually adopting HPS is that the transition period can be a negative experience for prospects and customers.  Being subjected to pieces from sales methods that have conflicting purposes can make them wary.  Some sales methods just don’t mix well.

It matters where you start.  It matters because of what the prospect sees.

If you start at the beginning, and use High Probability Prospecting (with no attempt to influence, persuade, or entice), the prospect will initially have one idea of what kind of person you are and how you do business.  If you then switch to using more traditional sales methods on the same prospect, they may decide that you can’t be trusted.

We don’t know if this is the real reason or not, but we do know that people have had extremely poor results when High Probability Prospecting was followed by traditional selling methods.  If you’re going to use any parts of a sales process that is designed to get someone to buy, you’ll get better results by starting out with that process from the beginning of your interaction with a prospect.  And once you switch to using HPS with the same prospect, stay with HPS all the way through the end.

For gradual implementation, we now believe that the best place to start using HPS is at the end of the sales process.  And then add the step that comes before the end, and so on, all the way back to the beginning.

The sequence of steps in the High Probability Selling Process is shown in an earlier post on this blog, Sequence of Steps in High Probability Selling

Note:  In this article, “We” means Paul Bunn and Carl Ingalls.


Workshops in March 2018:
Chapter 12 Updated on Thu 15 Mar for $95
Mindset Discovery on Wed 21 Mar for $255

Implementing High Probability Selling – Where to Start?

New Workshop: High Probability Mindset Discovery

This is new material, never offered in a workshop before.  The focus is on the mental side of High Probability Selling (HPS).  Things like attitudes, beliefs, habits, concepts, principles, guidelines, and language.  We call this the mindset of High Probability Selling.

We recommend this course for people who are just beginning with HPS (and have read the book at least once) and also for those who have had some training.

The course is presented by Paul Bunn and Carl Ingalls.  It consists of 3 sessions, each about two hours long, and spaced one week apart.  Sessions are conducted by teleconference, and are live interactive conversations.  We record each session and make the recordings available to the participants.

We interview each applicant by telephone before accepting them as a student.

Price:  $255 USD per person.  We accept PayPal and most major credit cards around the world.

Dates:  Three consecutive Tuesdays.  The first session is Tue 21 Nov 2017.  The second and third sessions are on Tue 28 Nov and Tue 5 Dec.

Time:  7:00 pm to 9:00 pm, USA Eastern Time (same as New York City).

For more information, or if you want to apply for this workshop, please visit our webpage at www.HighProbSell.com/workshops/mindset/

For other workshops in High Probability Selling, please visit our HPS Training webpage.

New Workshop: High Probability Mindset Discovery