The “All Buyers Are Liars” Trap

by Jacques Werth and Carl Ingalls

The belief that “all buyers are liars” is a trap.  It sets up the salesperson for failure.

“All buyers are liars” is also a self-perpetuating belief that makes itself true, once you’ve fallen for it.  The belief makes you do things that sabotage trust.  Salespeople who exaggerate the benefits and ignore the negatives can’t be trusted by their prospects, who often respond by lying about their buying intentions.

However, you don’t hear “all buyers are liars” from the top producing salespeople.  They know that they are more likely to get the truth from prospects when they themselves are completely truthful.

Mistrust breeds mistrust.  If you think your buyers are liars, they will probably think the same about you.

The “All Buyers Are Liars” Trap

Driving Your Customers

by Carl Ingalls

Watch your language.  Driving is what we do to sheep.  Is that how you feel about your customers?  If so, it probably shows.  If not, then be careful about the language you use, and the messages it sends.

If you don’t respect your customers, and you don’t show this in every detail, you can’t expect them to respect you.  Lack of respect leads to lack of trust, and we all know what that does to sales.

Driving Your Customers

Persuasion vs Trust

by Jacques Werth and Carl Ingalls

It’s harder to trust someone whose first thought is to influence my purchase decision.  Even if I can see that they only want to steer me toward something they think will be good for me, I know that they are not focused on listening to what I want, and that it’s going to be a time-consuming transaction at best.  If I wanted their help in making a purchase decision, I would ask for it.

Trust takes more than just good intentions.  Knowing that someone’s intention is to persuade me to go with something that they believe will be better for me is not enough, and especially if they haven’t listened.   Many terrible things have been done by people with good intentions.   I also need to trust in their ability to hear me well, and also in their ability to make good judgments based upon what they hear.  If they start out with anything at all that suggests a desire to influence me, then they have failed on both of those counts.

I would rather do business with someone who listens to what I want and helps me get it, than with someone who wants to change my mind.

Persuasion vs Trust